Using PEMF to treat traumatic brain injury



Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has been featured prominently in the news for the past few years. Public awareness of brain injuries has led to a growing number of people asking us about treatments for TBI, and in particular, mTBI. For those of you unfamiliar with the nomenclature, mTBI stands for “mild” TBI and this is often used synonymously with concussion. Moderate and severe TBI are much worse conditions of brain trauma, and the dividing line between mild and moderate is (usually) how long someone was in a coma post-traumatic injury


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TBI, TBI severity and dementia: what is the relationship?



There has been enormous speculation recently about how repetitive concussions could lead to dementia and/or early Alzheimer’s (or Alzheimer like symptoms). Loss of brain function with repetitive blows to the head does not seem like it would be debatable, but many hesitate to take a stand on it because of “lack of evidence”. After all, it could just be coincidence that people get dementia in their late 40s or early 50s after a long career in a sport or activity that repetitively causes glial damage without having time


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For some, a concussion is a temporary inconvenience. For others, the effects can be long lasting.



Neurophysiological deficits detected over one year post-concussion
Even though the water swirls the opposite direction down under, it looks like concussed brains in Australia look like concussed brains in North America; regardless of how long it has been since someone’s last concussion, it’s hard to hide neurophysiological changes that persist from the Brain Gauge methods. Dr. Alan Pearce of the University of Melbourne recently presented some very interesting data at an international meeting in Toronto. In his study, he made observations on individuals from three different groups: post-concussion


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