World Records



We’re getting stronger, taller and faster, but are we getting smarter?

Running a four minute mile was supposed to be impossible. Until 1954, most coaches, runners, scientists, and the even world’s top physiologists all declared that humans were physically incapable of a sub 4:00 performance, even given ideal training and race conditions. It was simply too fast.

In 1954 a young medical student named Roger Bannister proved them all wrong. On a windy day in Oxford, England, Bannister ran 1 mile in three minutes and 59.4


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Problems with concussion testing in sports



Most currently available concussion tests rely on baseline scores. At the beginning of the season, athletes complete an assessment to establish their baseline cognitive health. When an athlete sustains a head injury or shows symptoms of a concussion, a trainer or coach administers the test again and compares the two sets of scores. If the post-injury scores are substantially lower than the baseline results, athletes are removed from play.

At first glance, this approach seems reasonable. Everyone's brain is different, so by comparing a potentially concussed individual to that individual's


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Aging and brain plasticity: what causes the decline?



I’ve been in the research field for close to 40 years now (easily 40 if you count my years as an undergraduate biology major, when I was probably more interested in non-academic pursuits, but that is another story), and throughout that tenure, a question that has bothered people – as well as researchers – is why do people age at different rates? Why do some people age gracefully into their late 90s and others struggle through their 60s? As we began to do translational research (i.e., that brand of research


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The Need for Speed



People like to go fast. We like fast cars and fast lanes. We want to “Earn money fast!” and “Lose weight fast!” It’s why we blow our paychecks on the latest phones and the best service. As every third grader in a playground footrace will tell you, it’s fun to be the fastest.

That’s why we’re never surprised when Brain Gauge users seem most interested in their Speed metric. When we test college students, the football players always want to record their scores so they can


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For some, a concussion is a temporary inconvenience. For others, the effects can be long lasting.



Neurophysiological deficits detected over one year post-concussion
Even though the water swirls the opposite direction down under, it looks like concussed brains in Australia look like concussed brains in North America; regardless of how long it has been since someone’s last concussion, it’s hard to hide neurophysiological changes that persist from the Brain Gauge methods. Dr. Alan Pearce of the University of Melbourne recently presented some very interesting data at an international meeting in Toronto. In his study, he made observations on individuals from three different groups: post-concussion


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When it comes to nootropics, more isn't always better



Use of the Brain Gauge with the knowledge of a tuning curve will help you optimize brain performance.
Whether it's at work or on the field, humans are constantly looking for ways to get better. But our bodies, just like any machine, needed to be tuned in very specific ways in order to for us to achieve optimal performance. For example, if you want to run a fast marathon, you'll need to put in a lot of long runs and a lot of calories in the months leading up to


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Is Sleep a Form of Biohacking?



Sleep deprivation will negatively impact your Brain Gauge scores; optimal sleep will optimize your brain health.
One of the most simple and straightforward Brain Gauge tests is the simple reaction time test (RT). This type of test is commonly used as a good “first glance” at overall brain health. In this test, a delayed response time can be a strong indication that there is something unusual happening with your brain. However, this metric is very sensitive to a number of lifestyle factors (such as lack of sleep, medication side effects,


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Brain Gauge Concussion Scoring




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Concussion Study Update



A summary of the results from an ongoing concussion study.

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Summary of previous report: Our brain health assessment system is composed of a test device (the Brain Gauge; above) and a number of tests that task different mechanisms of information processing (e.g., lateral inhibition, adaptation, feed-forward inhibition, neuron-glial interactions). The results of these tests are then used to generate an overall performance score (or cortical metric). Sports concussion studies using this technology and protocols have established efficacy for detecting mTBI and tracking its recovery, demonstrating a 99% confidence level


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Improvements in Brain Gauge performance parallel mTBI recover



Brain Gauge data improves in mTBI patient after treatment with Dr. George Roth.


Dr. George Roth has consistently provided reports that demonstrate patient improvement in corticalmetrics post-treatment.



A 40 year old patient suffered direct left parietal head trauma from a motor vehicle collision, and 8 months post-trauma, the patient continued to suffer from cognitive, visual, and vestibular disorders. Patient was also sensitive to light and noise, reported neck pain, and was unable to continue in her post-graduate program. The patient had sustained one previous concussion in 2005.

Cortical Metrics tests


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