Problems with concussion testing in sports



Most currently available concussion tests rely on baseline scores. At the beginning of the season, athletes complete an assessment to establish their baseline cognitive health. When an athlete sustains a head injury or shows symptoms of a concussion, a trainer or coach administers the test again and compares the two sets of scores. If the post-injury scores are substantially lower than the baseline results, athletes are removed from play.

At first glance, this approach seems reasonable. Everyone's brain is different, so by comparing a potentially concussed individual to that individual's


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Alzheimer’s and Diabetes: Cause or Effect?



Alzheimer’s is often called “diabetes type 3” because there appears to be a correlation between the two disorders.

After first identifying amyloid β plaques and tau tangles in the brain of a deceased patient in the early 1900’s, Alois Alzheimer was careful to not infer that these structures had caused the dementia in the patient. Until recently, most of the research (at least by drug companies) has been aimed at finding ways to reverse the accumulation, or at least stop the spread of these structures. While drugs have


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TBI, TBI severity and dementia: what is the relationship?



There has been enormous speculation recently about how repetitive concussions could lead to dementia and/or early Alzheimer’s (or Alzheimer like symptoms). Loss of brain function with repetitive blows to the head does not seem like it would be debatable, but many hesitate to take a stand on it because of “lack of evidence”. After all, it could just be coincidence that people get dementia in their late 40s or early 50s after a long career in a sport or activity that repetitively causes glial damage without having time


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Why the Brain Gauge works for people of all ages



Cortical metrics stay within normative range for a large age spectrum – as long as people stay healthy.
We often get asked whether age-related declines in skin sensitivity can affect your Brain Gauge scores. This is a legitimate concern, as confounding factors in the peripheral nervous system can invalidate many neurological tests. If peripheral sensory receptors are transmitting weak or noisey signals in response to a certain stimulus, the test will fail to effectively activate the central nervous system. Fortunately, we kept this issue in mind during our research and development,


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Concussion Study Update



A summary of the results from an ongoing concussion study.

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Summary of previous report: Our brain health assessment system is composed of a test device (the Brain Gauge; above) and a number of tests that task different mechanisms of information processing (e.g., lateral inhibition, adaptation, feed-forward inhibition, neuron-glial interactions). The results of these tests are then used to generate an overall performance score (or cortical metric). Sports concussion studies using this technology and protocols have established efficacy for detecting mTBI and tracking its recovery, demonstrating a 99% confidence level


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Case study: Promising Results with Pre-Parkinson's Disease



Brain Gauge data from treatment of one of Dr. Phil Schalow’s patients with pre-Parkinson’s
condition.


We’ve been busy getting ready to launch the Brain Gauge, but meanwhile, there's lots of great news from our users of the Brain Gauge Pro to report on……we’ll do our best to catch up by having several newsletters in the next few weeks.

In the last post, we highlighted Timing Perception and told you which scientific findings related to it. In brief, a simple measure of timing perception (or duration


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Improvements in Brain Gauge performance parallel mTBI recover



Brain Gauge data improves in mTBI patient after treatment with Dr. George Roth.


Dr. George Roth has consistently provided reports that demonstrate patient improvement in corticalmetrics post-treatment.



A 40 year old patient suffered direct left parietal head trauma from a motor vehicle collision, and 8 months post-trauma, the patient continued to suffer from cognitive, visual, and vestibular disorders. Patient was also sensitive to light and noise, reported neck pain, and was unable to continue in her post-graduate program. The patient had sustained one previous concussion in 2005.

Cortical Metrics tests


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Case Study: NUCCA treatment leads to neurological improvement




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